Patek Philippe Nautilus 3712 '3 Dots'

The ref.

Museum Piece
Patek PhilippePatek Philippe’s ultra exclusive timepieces have usually been reserved for the lucky few.

Introduction

The ref. 3712 was the first truly complicated Nautilus and was only produced for one year!Almost 30 years after the introduction of the pioneering ref. 3711 Nautilus, Patek introduced the first truly complicated Nautilus as the ref. 3712 (of course, the Nautilus 3710 with power reserve indicator came out in 1998 already, but the mere addition of one complication doesn’t necessarily make a ‘complicated watch’). The ref. 3712 was produced only in 2005 and was replaced just a year later by the ref. 5712. This makes the 3712 among the rarest of all Nautilus variants and highly sought after.The 3712 adds a decentral second, a moonphase (and date function), and a power reserve indicator to the classic 40 mm ‘Jumbo’ Nautilus case. The three indicators are placed around the dial in a surprising manner, which gives the watch a quirky yet surprisingly harmonious appearance.The iconic Gerald Genta-designed octagonal case is executed in stainless steel and features the well-known integrated Nautilus bracelet. The watch sports a blue degradé dial with a horizontally embossed pattern. A see through sapphire caseback reveals an unobstructed view of Patek’s caliber 240 PS IRM C LU—with PS for petite seconde (small seconds), IRM for indication de réserve de marche (power reserve), C for calendrier (calendar), and LU for lune (moon). The movement is exquisitely finished and features a 21k yellow gold microrotor.The watch is absolutely unworn and originates from a local collector that bought it at Schaap & Citroen in 2006. The papers have no name on it and the set is complete, including the price tag at €15.800!

Description

Patek PhilippePatek Philippe’s ultra exclusive timepieces have usually been reserved for the lucky few. Its mechanical masterpieces were traditionally made from precious metals and worn by an elegant lady or gentleman.Patek Philippe NautilusPatek Philippe’s ultra exclusive timepieces have usually been reserved for the lucky few. Its mechanical masterpieces were traditionally made from precious metals and worn by an elegant lady or gentleman. After the roaring success of Audemars Piguet’s Gerald Genta-designed Royal Oak, Patek decided that it also needed its own luxury steel sports watch.As the story goes, Gerald Genta drew the initial design of the Nautilus while observing a group of Patek executives having dinner during the Baselworld watch fair. When the Nautilus was introduced in 1976 it was advertised as a watch that worked equally well with a wet suit as with a dinner suit. Not quite incidentally, it was also the most expensive steel sports watch available in the market.Ever since the very first Nautilus, the Patek and Nautilus names have become inseparable. Over the years, many variations, with different materials, dial colors and layouts, and complications, have been added to the Nautilus lineup. However, Genta’s original design elements have remained in all these executions: a rounded octagonal bezel inspired by the portholes of a ship with ‘ears’ on the sides of the case that look like the hinges of a porthole.